Tate: The Photographer's Ideas Book

Author: Lorna Yabsley

Publisher: Ilex Press

Total Pages: 176

Let your creativity run wild and breathe new life into your photography. Bored of bokeh? Fed up with f-stops? Then it's time to refresh your creativity with a lively exploration of photography at the cutting edge. There's always a new angle with which to shoot your subject, a different light to capture, or a completely new genre to try out, so there's never an excuse for your camera - whatever kind it is - to gather dust! This little book, full of big ideas from a range of iconic and contemporary photographers, will inspire you to think differently. With a new concept on every page, you will discover fresh ways of tackling your subjects to create work that is original and exciting.

Tate: The Photography Ideas Book

Author: Lorna Yabsley

Publisher: Hachette UK

Total Pages: 176

It's time to refresh your creativity with this lively exploration of photography at the cutting edge. There's always a new angle with which to shoot your subject, a different shade of light to capture or a completely new genre to try out, so there's never an excuse for your camera to gather dust. This little book is full of big ideas that will inspire you to think differently. With a new concept on every page, you will discover fresh ways of tackling your subjects to create work that is original and exciting.

The Photobook

Author: Patrizia Di Bello

Publisher: Routledge

Total Pages: 256

The photograph found a home in the book before it won for itself a place on the gallery wall. Only a few years after the birth of photography, the publication of Henry Fox Talbot's "The Pencil of Nature" heralded a new genre in the history of the book, one in which the photograph was the primary vehicle of expression and communication, or stood in equal if sometimes conflicted partnership with the written word. In this book, practicing photographers and writers across several fields of scholarship share a range of fresh approaches to reading the photobook, developing new ways of understanding how meaning is shaped by an image's interaction with its text and context and engaging with the visual, tactile and interactive experience of the photobook in all its dimensions. Through close studies of individual works, the photobook from fetishised objet d'art to cheaply-printed booklet is explored and its unique creative and cultural contributions celebrated.

Reading Photographs

Author: Richard Salkeld

Publisher: A&C Black

Total Pages: 185

Basics Creative Photography 04: Reading the Image is an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to theories of representation and how they can be applied to photography.

One and Five Ideas

Author: Terry Smith

Publisher: Duke University Press

Total Pages: 168

In One and Five Ideas eminent critic, historian, and former member of the Art & Language collective Terry Smith explores the artistic, philosophical, political, and geographical dimensions of Conceptual Art and conceptualism. These four essays and a conversation with Mary Kelly—published between 1974 and 2012—contain Smith's most essential work on Conceptual Art and his argument that conceptualism was key to the historical transition from modern to contemporary art. Nothing less than a distinctive theory of Conceptual and contemporary art, One and Five Ideas showcases the critical voice of one of the major art theorists of our time.

Embodying Relation

Author: Allison Moore

Publisher: Duke University Press

Total Pages: 376

In Embodying Relation Allison Moore examines the tensions between the local and the global in the art photography movement in Bamako, Mali, which blossomed in the 1990s after Malian photographers Seydou Keïta and Malick Sidibé became internationally famous and the Bamako Photography Biennale was founded. Moore traces the trajectory of Malian photography from the 1880s—when photography first arrived as an apparatus of French colonialism—to the first African studio practitioners of the 1930s and the establishment in 1994 of the Bamako Biennale, Africa's most important continent-wide photographic exhibition. In her detailed discussion of Bamakois artistic aesthetics and institutions, Moore examines the post-fame careers of Keïta and Sidibé, the biennale's structure, the rise of women photographers, cultural preservation through photography, and how Mali's shift to democracy in the early 1990s enabled Bamako's art scene to flourish. Moore shows how Malian photographers' focus on cultural exchange, affective connections with different publics, and merging of traditional cultural precepts with modern notions of art embody Caribbean philosopher and poet Édouard Glissant's notion of “relation” in ways that spark new artistic forms, practices, and communities.

How Photography Became Contemporary Art

Author: Andy Grundberg

Publisher: Yale University Press

Total Pages: 297

A leading critic’s inside story of “the photo boom” during the crucial decades of the 1970s and 80s When Andy Grundberg landed in New York in the early 1970s as a budding writer, photography was at the margins of the contemporary art world. By 1991, when he left his post as critic for the New York Times, photography was at the vital center of artistic debate. Grundberg writes eloquently and authoritatively about photography’s “boom years,” chronicling the medium’s increasing role within the most important art movements of the time, from Earth Art and Conceptual Art to performance and video. He also traces photography’s embrace by museums and galleries, as well as its politicization in the culture wars of the 80s and 90s. Grundberg reflects on the landmark exhibitions that defined the moment and his encounters with the work of leading photographers—many of whom he knew personally—including Gordon Matta-Clark, Cindy Sherman, and Robert Mapplethorpe. He navigates crucial themes such as photography’s relationship to theory as well as feminism and artists of color. Part memoir and part history, this perspective by one of the period’s leading critics ultimately tells a larger story about the crucial decades of the 70s and 80s through the medium of photography.

August Strindberg

Author: Oll? Granath

Publisher: Tate

Total Pages: 166

"While August Strindberg (1849-1912) is well known to an international audience as a prolific writer of plays, novels, poetry, scientific essays and letters, his work in the visual arts has remained largely unseen. This illustrated book examines the paintings, drawings and photographs that display Strindberg's independent and radical approach to art, and his experimental innovations in photography." "Critics have compared Strindberg's paintings with Turner's but also with those of much later movements such as Informalism and Expressionism. In his youth, working as an art critic for a Swedish magazine in the 1870s, he was one of the first in Sweden to show understanding for the Impressionist movement in Paris. In writings in the 1890s he anticipated ideas favoured by Dada and Surrealism."--BOOK JACKET.